October 2017: Upcoming events

I've got a few events coming up later this month that I'm excited about. Join me at one--or all!--of them. 

October 21st, 2017 at 2pm: Fact Into Fiction: Writing Historical Narratives

I'll be leading a 30-minute craft talk on writing historical fiction at the main Cambridge Public Library as part of their NanoWriMo Author Insights series. 
Main Library, 449 Broadway, Cambridge

October 26th, 8:30pm: Four Stories at Lit Crawl

Four Stories is a literary series bridging Greater Boston’s nightlife and arts community (and now Tokyo's, too!). Each event is held in a club, bar, or lounge, and features appearances from some of the most acclaimed authors in the nation, reading their work under a unified theme and answering joke questions from the audience. In this special installment for Lit Crawl, we will be featuring Olivia Kate Cerrone, author of The Hunger Saint, a historical novella about the child miners of Sicily; E. Dolores Johnson, an essayist who focuses on inter-racialism; Whitney Scharer, whose forthcoming debut novel, The Age of Light, is based on the life of pioneering photographer Lee Miller; and Courtney Sender, whose fiction has appeared in The Kenyon Review, AGNI, American Short Fiction, and The Georgia Review. So come experience Four Stories. It’s like a nineteenth-century salon ― socializing, witty banter, corsets optional.
Salon Acote 132 Newbury Street

Saturday, October 28th, 11:30-12:15: Boston Book Festival Readings: Coming of Age

Three debut novelists will read from their recently published works, all of which focus on the turbulence and transformation endemic to growing up and coming of age. In CottonmouthsKelly J. Ford’s protagonist has a bit rockier journey than most, contending with meth labs, intolerance, and unrequited love following a return to Arkansas after dropping out of college. The title character in Gabe Habash’s novel Stephen Florida is, if anything, too driven by his desire to become an NCAA wrestling champion during his senior year of college. Habash’s novel, according to the Atlantic, “captures how competitiveness and masculinity can unravel those who blindly follow its codes.” And Simeon Marsalis’s As Lie Is to Grin, which was recently shortlisted for the Center for Fiction’s First Novel Prize, also uses college as the backdrop for his protagonist’s self-discovery, as he attempts to find his place at the largely white University of Vermont while immersing himself in black literary history. Our host for this session of fiction readings is Whitney Scharer, one of the curators of the Arlington Author Salon.
BPL Newsfeed Cafe 700 Boylston Street, Boston, MA

Announcing...my book!

Delighted to announce that my first novel, The Age of Light, has sold to Little, Brown for publication in early 2019. It happened last week and I'm still adjusting to the idea that I'm going to be a published novelist. The entire process has been a whirlwind, led by my inimitable agent, Julie Barer at The Book Group, who shepherded me through many editor calls and handled all the shocked emails I sent her with trademark grace and aplomb. I'll be working with Judy Clain at Little, Brown and couldn't be happier about it. 

Here's the official announcement from Publishers Marketplace: 

University of Washington MFA graduate Whitney Scharer's THE AGE OF LIGHT, about Vogue model turned pioneering photographer Lee Miller and her complicated relationship with artist Man Ray, told in the interweaving timelines of bohemian 1930s Paris and war-torn Nazi Germany, to Judy Clain at Little, Brown, by Julie Barer at The Book Group (NA).

Hooray! More news coming soon... 

Take a class with me!

I'm excited to be teaching a seminar at GrubStreet in downtown Boston: Fact into Fiction: Writing Historical Narratives. The seminar is on Friday, September 29th (note new date!) from 10:30-1:30, and you can learn more or sign up by visiting GrubStreet's website. Join me! It's going to be a great class. 

Here's the description:

Historical novels based on real people or real events abound, but incorporating historical events and figures into a narrative can be complicated and confusing. Writers wonder: how much research do I have to do? How can I successfully write about a place and time that feels utterly different from my own life? What are the rules for fictionalizing the life of a real person? The truth is that there’s no one right way to write fiction about the past, but there are tools and guidelines you can use to be comfortable with your choices. In this seminar, we’ll take a look at some examples of successful literary historical fiction, discuss research techniques, and spend some time working on scenes from our own projects. You’ll leave the seminar able to articulate your own philosophy about what you’ve chose to research and what you’ve chosen to invent, and with some new tricks for making history come alive.

Welcome!

Welcome to my website. I'm planning to use the blog section of my site to post about projects I'm working on and share my knowledge about the book cover design process. I'll also be posting writing news here. Stay tuned, and thanks for visiting!